Posted in BR: Book Review

BR: Star Cursed by Jessica Spotswood Book Review

 

Warning: Here be spoilers. If you are interested in reading this book, and you dislike spoilers, RUN. As Star Crossed by Jessica Spotswood is the middle of a trilogy, I cannot help but spoil the first book at least.

premise

The Cahill sisters, living in an oppressive regime of patriarchy, are forced to keep their magic secret. Older sister Cate is torn between her choice to announce her intention (a tradition within their society). Should she marry and have children? In this case, who does she marry? Does she marry for love or for status? Or, should she join the Sisterhood, a convent for women?

spoilers start now. run.

conflict

Ultimately, this is the middle of a trilogy. Naturally, there is a lot of tension between the characters. In particular, the crux of this book lies in the conflicts among the Cahill sisters, the convent sisters, and within the society as a whole.

It’s a hard thing to balance as part of this experience, dealing with so much pressure with the characters at every turn. Within each family, there is some sort of fight for power. For instance, the most notable ongoing problem is between Maura and Cate (plus occasionally Tess is thrown in there). Given what happened with Maura’s love life in book 1, it is understandable that things were messy for her. So, in true Slytherin style, Maura is ambitiously trying to be the best witch of her time. This may sound fine, until you hear Cate being called into power by Sister Cora (leader of the sisterhood).

Incidentally, this tension also rises beyond Cate and Maura. They are both mentored by two opposing leaders within the sisterhood. Cora, diplomatic and somewhat hesitant, is the current figure at the helm of the Sisterhood. Inez, aggressive and urgent, is leading Maura to get women up against the men. Cora and Cate don’t connect that much, but when they do interact, it is powerful stuff.

On an even larger scale, there is the obvious tension between the Sisterhood and the Brotherhood. Beyond that, it is just women and men, at odds with the double standards set by the patriarchy. Sachi and her illegitimate sister are prime examples of men unwilling to acknowledge their mistakes while also acting as overbearing figures towards women.

nuance

Being the second book, there are hints that some men don’t believe in the oppression of women. Finn is an example of them. I like that not all women are presented as morally good as opposed to men being evil. Instead, there are all these shades of grey. It is really unclear what will happen in the next book.

The scene with Sachi’s sister (whose name escapes me) and their father was truly heartbreaking and kind of terrifying. I don’t like seeing women running for their lives just for disagreeing. Physical intimidation is something I had encountered a lot within discourse, and I think surely one can communicate without it. Sure, the character is presented as a hypocrite. But, I am really hoping for some nice closure for Sachi’s sister…even if I can’t remember her name. It starts with an R.

 

  After reading the Raven Cycle, Maggie Stiefvater became one of the most interesting authors on my
While I did enjoy The Final Empire novel, Brandon Sanderson completely blew me away with the sequel, The
The Love for V.E. Schwab I started reading V.E. Schwab's work about a year ago.
Posted in media, Squee

Illuminae Files Spotify Playlist Project Entry

Hi. This is my first Spotify Playlist Project entry of 2018! As a series, this collection of songs are tied to the essence of a given book. In this case, I am talking about the first book in the Illuminae Files series. Ready? Here we go.  SPOILERS AHEAD.

“Bart, he is establishing mood!”

(Obscure The Simpsons reference)
The Adventure by Angels and Airwaves

Kind of song that plays while the credits roll, because this is the kind of story that needs to come with an introduction sequences.

“Sign of the Times” by Harry Styles
This song’s sound prickled through the narrative to me. I just felt like it was Kady and Ezra’s song while they were trying to survive while their planet is under attack. In fact, the song continues to be reflected through the story as Kady takes charge of their destiny.

separating

“Gravity” by Embrace sounds like the aftermath of a space war. Also: it reminds me of Ezra quite a bit, as he misses Kady. Obviously, a joke is at hand here, because space, gravity, get it? Get it?

“When I was Your Man” by Bruno Mars. More heartbreak, and I want this song to echo the relationships of the adult characters, too.

computer whiz

Kady surfing and cracking codes reminds me of “Feel Good Inc,” by Gorillaz.

AIDAN

“Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen is like the best depiction of what AIDAN’s meltdowns sound like to me. An unraveling of a whole sweater.

fight!!

“Watercolours” by Pendulum is the essence of the fight scenes in Illuminae, particularly when Kady has to fight people on Ezra’s ship. This song can also double up as a manifestation of AIDAN’s breakdown and subsequent attacks toward ships.

aidan and kady

“More than You Know” by Axwel /\Ingrosso embodies this moment when AIDAN is fascinated by Kady. And, in a bizarre way, I was intrigued by these glimpses of AIDAN admiring the continuing persistence of this young person.

ezra and kady: THE END (ROUND 1)

“One Way Ticket” by ONE OK ROCK could easily play in the background of this book’s final scenes.

One final note: mothers

“I Miss You” by blink 182 and “Mama I’m Coming Home” by Ozzy Osbourne are the tunes I would like to end this Spotify Playlist Project entry. Because, you know, moms are kind of central to this book.

 

Summary of Post: This post is a discussion of Rick Yancey's The 5th Wave and its reflection on humanity's
The Love for V.E. Schwab I started reading V.E. Schwab's work about a year ago.
When watching Poldark, most people feel passionate about Ross and his story, but I am
Posted in BR: Book Review

BR: The Upside of Unrequited Book Review

 

 

I devoured Becky Albertalli’s second novel over the course of two days. Many thoughts bounding around my head as I write this review at 2 AM. Hope you are ready for some serious fangirl action…and stuff.

premise

Molly Peskin-Susu is an awkward chubby girl who has had twenty-six crushes. All of them were unrequited. As her sister falls in love with her dream girl, she is confronted with her own journey to find herself (not in a cheesy way, I promise). Her sister sets her up with hipster Will. Enter Reid, her coworker, who likes all things Ren Faire and Middle-Earth. And chocolate eggs.

review

If you follow me on Goodreads, you will see that I fangirl over this novel. I loved it even more than Simon Vs. the Homo Sapiens’ Agenda. This one had more complexity to it, and more nuance going on in terms of sexuality, body shapes, and relationship with siblings/family. I gave it four stars.

Here’s why.

PS: SPOILERS AHEAD.

siblings conflict

The conflict between Cassie and Molly in this novel parallels some of the tension between Nadine and Karen. While it is not exactly a mirror image of the cause of conflict, the idea is the same. Two siblings lose touch and then they’re unable to connect as much, or even see eye to eye.

In some ways, Cassie is hit with this wave of love while Molly grapples with her own place as a person without a twin. To me, this is the crux of this story truly.

body image

I also like the mirroring of Grandma’s body image issues with Molly’s own feelings towards her appearance. And, as a chubby person myself, I liked that Albertalli handles this generational disconnect in a  sensitive way. To me, I often get criticized for my body image and it felt kind of nice to see this critique as a genuine issue on the person’s part, not my own. It’s hard to divorce this shaming from fat bodies, unfortunately, and it’s quite lovely to see a novel tackle that issue in a tasteful manner.

Her body image plays into her assumptions about her self worth often. I found the whole Will thing to be a compound of two issues. First, I think Molly was unsure of whether she can be with Reid. Two, to an extent, she tries to tap into what Cassie is seeing here. Twins and best friends together? Sounds nice and neat.

You know what I really like? That she didn’t end up with Will. Seriously. Best choice ever.

romance

Overall, I like the romances here. The one between Cassie and Mina could have used some more focus, but I understand that she’s not the center of this story. Reid and Molly’s connection was charming and sweet.

The assumption that someone as nerdy as Reid can’t be a good boyfriend was challenged pretty well. Although I will say that I don’t think that being physical is what makes someone good as a partner. But, hey. I don’t know about relationships all that much. This is all guess work for me.

Okay. bye.

 

Way back in February, I went to the library and grabbed my first Sarah J.
Yesterday, I finished reading the sequel to An Ember in the Ashes, which is called A Torch Against
Set in 1960, the film opens with the death of Ellie's mother as she prepares
Posted in BR: Book Review

BR: The Ocean at the End of the Lane Book Review

I finished reading The Ocean at the End of the Lane on the last day of 2017. My brain has been struggling to contain the excitement of having read my first Gaiman novel. Seriously. In some ways, The Ocean in the End of the Lane will always be special to me, because of its content. Uh, let me dive into this review, though, because I can gush all day.

premise

An unnamed middle aged man returns to his family home, and recalls the adventure of a summer he spent with childhood friend, Lettie Hempstock.

theme–childhood and imagination

My favorite aspect of this story has to be the magical realism feel to it. Throughout the novel, it is unclear if the story is literal or figurative. This blurring of reality with imagination is very much rooted in childhood (from what I experienced).

But, also, the charming factor in this story has to be the way the characters behave. Sure, we go on a supernatural kind of surreal adventure with monsters and a worm that turns into an awful creature. However, the children (unnamed main character and Lettie) behave like children. They talk like children, and they cry, throw tantrums, and argue with their sister (well, this is mainly our dude character, but hey).

Gaiman creates such a rosy view of life at first, but then, it is warped and scary in parts (nothing disturbing, but it will linger for a bit).

Speaking of which…

darkness in the so-called “pure”

The story begins with a quote about children remembering or knowing things that adults assume they wouldn’t. It’s about the way we undermine children and their maturity. Truly, our unnamed hero and Lettie see some really dark stuff, stuff we wouldn’t expect children to comprehend, and they fight valiantly.

As I have said earlier, I am in awe of this teetering balance Gaiman strikes between child characters, surreal story lines, and darkness. I am intrigued by Ursula Montakin, her connection to our main character’s family, and what that really means in regards to children’s understanding of infidelity, gender roles, and family dynamics in relation to all of these things.

There is a scene in particular that stunned me: the bath scene with our main character’s father. In some ways, it highlighted the idea of embarrassment and shame contrasting with social expectations from parents. Like, maybe it’s just me, but I don’t see parents negatively when they can’t “control” their children. But Ursula signifies the pressure on parents to be authority figures, even if it means they get to act aggressive.

 friendship and family

Most importantly, this is a story about found-family vs. blood family. I think our main character would have loved to see Lettie and her strangely beautiful ocean at the end of the lane. Her family, equally invested in child-like wonder and superstition, lead a safe home to the main hero. It is a home he goes back to, over and over, with and without Lettie.

It is such a telling sign that Lettie’s legacy, consciously or not, drives the main character to return for refuge throughout his life. If this isn’t what the best friendships are about, I don’t know what is.

 

Summary of Post: This post is a discussion of Rick Yancey's The 5th Wave and its reflection on humanity's
Some of you may know that I lived in Egypt in the 90s. I was
While I did enjoy The Final Empire novel, Brandon Sanderson completely blew me away with the sequel, The
Posted in About Me, New Year Challenges

On Developing a Gratitude Practice

 

Sometimes, when I talk to certain people, I see it clearly. Negativity. Like a lot of it. Granted, my own knack for slipping into a nice bath of complaints has been around for ages. Still, I am not one to give into the default settings of my programming. I’d been toying with the idea of a gratitude practice, but it wasn’t until Inge mentioned it that I saw it as a possibility. Here is my gratitude practice thus far.

3 in-progress learning experiences

I have looked into templates on Pinterest when I started this practice way back in November. The reason behind templates is twofold. First, it is to facilitate discussion when I am not feeling my best. Often, my moods settle on an epic low note for days or weeks, so I struggle to come up with coherent thoughts as it is. A template creates a routine to this journal. It also acts as a guiding hand, because I am out of practice when it comes to positivity and gratitude–and I admit this not as a point of pride. Not at all. I want to manage my mental health better.

Victim-mentality drives my narrative and I have a rather cruel lens filtering my daily ups and downs. Reframing the experiences as a learning opportunity is like earth-shattering information to me. I do a lot of panicking when conflict arises, and this template reminds me to try and stay calm.

Plus, I think when I look back and see lessons repeating, it neutralizes the dooms-day threat a little bit. It gives me concrete examples of this conflict repeating. Besides, it could act as a good jumping off point for meditation, journaling, and therapy discussions. Hey, maybe I’ll be more self aware and conscious of how I interact with the world (that is the dream, to be quite frank).

a list of things i am grateful for

I try to list some stuff that makes me happy that day. Moreover, I try not to repeat too much. Now, obviously, sometimes duplicates will appear on my lists, but I do make it a point to not check what I wrote the day before until I am done.

but…testing more prompts

But, I noticed that my journal can be a bit cyclical by doing just two things every day. SO. I am incorporating more prompts. I want to reflect more on different things, and then derive my own gratitude nuggets from whatever it is I have reflected on.

The point is for it to be fairly brief and always consistent. So far, I had been journaling every couple of days, which is not that good. I am going to try it tonight, and keep it

 

    Hi there. While watching Ely's introduction of her cat Percy, I thought of
Posted in Uncategorized

Bullet Journaling and My 2018 Approach To It

Bullet journals are kind of a fashion statement for those who love organizing things. And, let me get on the record to say: I don’t organize things. I am messy, and moody, so it’s hard for me to predict what I can manage to do next.

But, I had started my bullet journal in August of 2017. I think it has helped me a lot, and I am sharing my experience with you today.

2017 lessons on bullet journals

I did not know much about bullet journals early on. Here is a nice link on what these journals’ functions are. Anyway, I have seen many posts on YouTube and Pinterest regarding ideas on how to set up a bullet journal. Essentially, I have been trying out different set up formats and pages.

My favorite way to use the journal is to track my daily activity, mood, and set up a list of the books I got for the month along with the ones I did read as well.

I found that my bullet journal has helped me look forward to my day a little better, for simple reasons. When I decorate my journal for the next day, I find myself decompressing before bed while working on them. Even the simple act of adding stickers, or changing the color of the pen would give me a little boost–I know, it sounds silly.

2018 ideas for my bullet journal

Part of the journal’s charm is to add awareness to one’s daily activities. I noticed that my days tend to be repetitious in terms of the individual tasks. As a result, a sense of hopelessness has been festering along the way.

So, I am thinking of changing my goals for each day. For instance, I always try to write a post on my blog each day, but, instead, it takes me all day, staring at a blank screen. Sometimes, I think I am really clever and attempt to multitask. Let me tell you something about me: I don’t get much done when I am trying to do more than one thing at a time. Therefore, I need to stop trying to go on YouTube, and write a post, while tweeting. It’s not working for me at all.

How does this relate to bullet journals? Well, I am thinking of using mine to also include reminders. Like, “Hey, if you finished this task, give yourself 10 minutes on YouTube.” For a while, I used to designate Pomodoros for each day, and that worked well. I am thinking of going back to that.

Another really neat use of bullet journals is that of trackers. I have slowly been integrating mood trackers, as someone who has a milder form of bipolar disorder (it’s called cyclothymia). I want to cross reference my journals, though. I keep a journal for therapy, and I am thinking of including a short description of how I am feeling, accompanied with why I think I feel that way.

In addition, tracking reading time (in Pomodoros, for ease) sounds like a good idea, because I don’t regulate how often I read. Instead, I try to rely on my mood, which is not such a good idea. Anything that involves me sitting still for a long period of time intimidates me. I think scheduling a time for me to get off the Internet and read will help me disconnect.

Finally, I want to use my bullet journal as a practice in accepting imperfection. I tend to beat myself up for not drawing the perfect shape, or messing up the spelling of a word. For the new year, I want to embrace these flaws and carry on with my journal without ripping pages (that’s why the page numbers help me).

 

I spend a lot of time online. Perhaps I'm not alone in this, but it
          Welcome back to another Top Ten Tuesday. This week, the
As you may have read in previous blog entries, I will be participating in Emojiathon
Posted in BR: Book Review

Illuminae Book Review

I have been hearing quite a bit about Illuminae and its subsequent books. Hesitant, I picked up the two books out already (Illuminae and Gemina). It took me ages to actually pick it up because the series is hyped beyond measure. Here are my thoughts on the book.

premise

Set in space, the story begins with the destruction of a planet. On that planet, there is a couple breaking up. Ezra and Kady are fighting and they have to awkwardly get in a car together to avoid death.

And the story takes off from there.

characters

I did not expect to love Ezra and Kady that much. In fact, I was unsure about them for a long time. But, even McNulty made an impression on me, and I cannot get over this group of bad-ass sassy peeps.

Kady, a hacker and a general computer whiz, is sarcastic. She tends to have little connection with rules and regulations. When confronted with authority, she tends to be cynical and eve hostile.

Not Ezra. He is more likely to be compliant, makes friends on the ship he’s on, and even opens up about romance/relationships with McNulty.

 format

The format of this book is creative and rather fitting of the story. I do like the emails and the AIDAN freak out sessions most. I do have to say that some of the pages were hard to impact me emotionally. Like, I am not sure if I am supposed to care for AIDAN or not. Same with all the scenes between Kady and AIDAN, or the fights between space ships. I was rather confused for a little. It definitely takes some getting used to.

humor/language

I liked all the bleeped sections in the novel. It just added a sense of depth to the characters and the setting they’re in. The usage of the word “chum” was kind of excessive. I don’t know if it’s Australian for “dude” but, dang it, you don’t have to use it so much.

Astro Princess made me smile real big. I loved this story, even if I was somewhat slow while reading it (that format…it takes some getting used to).

Rating: 4 stars

Image courtesy of picjumbo_com on Pixabay (Link here) Patrick Ness thought of two ideas when
Summary of Post: This post is a discussion of Rick Yancey's The 5th Wave and its reflection on humanity's
Some of you may know that I lived in Egypt in the 90s. I was
Posted in The Spotify Playlist Project

The Spotify Playlist Project: Turtles All the Way Down

 

After finishing Turtles All the Way Down, I immediately began to work on my newest Spotify Playlist Project entry. A tumultuous and intense story centered on the mind, I dug through mellow tunes to articulate the feeling of being in that head space.

Let’s go.

Beginnings

“Without Lights” by Elliot Moss reminded me of Aza, and her identity, validity, and her ability to go on a quest for the missing billionaire. By the same token, I really like the image of the girl lost in the forest portrayed in the song. It makes me think of Aza’s search for her own mental health coping mechanisms.

Painting Greys” by Emmit Fenn.  Kind of a Daisy song, but mostly comments on living with OCD as well. “She got my heart in a choke hold.”

“Let You Down” by NF. Aza’s theme, to me, is about her inability to keep her OCD and depersonalization in check. She loses herself often in the metaphors, in the cyclical thinking, and in the impulsive actions driven by her obsessions. “All these voices in my head get loud/I wish that I could shut them out/I’m sorry that I let you down.”

middle

Easier” by Mansionair is the theme for Aza in her attempts to be with Davis. A song dedicated to her exploration of sexuality and affection under a lens with OCD taints.

“Lost Tonight” by Sa-Je materializes the transcendent lost feeling that Aza has while on the quest for Davis’ father. In addition, Noah’s connection with her is also alluded to here.

There is a specific scene I have in mind for “Yours” by SG Lewis. It involves webcam or FaceTime. The cuteness of Aza read Davis’ blog is also evoked by this song to me.

ending

“Six Feet Under” by Billie Ellish colors in the image of Davis’ father and his fate. I feel like the song has less to do with literal connections, and, instead, it communicates the nature of this man and Davis’ mother.

“Better Off (Captain Planet)” by Ziggy Alberts is the hopeful connection between Aza and Davis, “If I could be your Captain Planet/Would you be my girl.” In a way, the song touches on the scenes with watching the stars and planets, too, and all the moments Aza watches space movies with him. (I love these scenes so much).

Secret for the Mad” by Dodie Clark speaks to me on an emotional level. I think Aza would like this song on her computer, in a playlist for when things get rough again.

“Moon Song” and “Tonight You Belong To Me” are all about that ending, “…no one ever says good-bye unless they want to see you again.”

Listen along

  It's been a while since my Spotify Playlist Project entries have rolled on this
Welcome to another round of the Spotify Playlist Project here. This time, I'll be focusing
New series included: I love making playlists and exploring new music. Therefore, it became an
Posted in Top Five Wednesday

Top 5 Books I am Grateful that I Read This Year

 

 

Welcome to Top 5 Wednesday, a meme based on a Goodreads group. In this group, there are topics generated for the book community to list their top 5. This week, I will be listing the top 5 books I am grateful that I read this year.

5. the sun is also a star by nicola yoon

It was not a perfect book, but it highlighted things that I worried about as an immigrant coming to the states. Concerns about identity, stereotypes, and belonging all sprang up in this book in a sensitive and yet honest way.

4. Not a drop to drink by mindy mcginnis

This book posits really difficult moral questions in an intense yet simple way. I am grateful for Lynn and her mother, Lucy, and Mr. Stebbs. They brought forth a tough discussion on compassion in trying times. In no way was this story idealistic in its approach to these choices we have to make. And, yes, we aren’t in a post-apocalyptic world (debatable honestly). But, I will say that we still have to make a choice about the kind of people we want to be in the face of adversity and difficulty.

3. A Monster calls by patrick ness

Call me entirely too romantic, but I find myself thinking of this story often. It’s about letting go of people, releasing connections we once thought were necessary. It’s about the loss of innocence in the face of death. Most importantly, it about speaking your truth and facing yourself. Being honest with yourself in terms of troubles, pain, and frustrations. I love this book. So grateful that I have read it this year.

2. more happy than not by adam silvera

This book made me see my complicated relationship with my past. Like, I sometimes assume that things were much better before I sought help. Erasure of the past, if it ever is an option, is something I wish for often as well. And, this book showed me that time and events have a complicated relationship with the development of a person. Also: consequences of radical actions (like erasing a past) are beyond the scheme of what one assumes to be possible and predictable.

 

 1.  turtles all the way down by john green 

Ah, jeez. I am so in love with this story. It really spoke to me about relationships (friendships) and mental illness, particularly anxiety and depersonalization (both of which I have officially been diagnosed with). The story is moving and funny, sad and hopeful all at once. There are references to spirals, which is something my mom always points out to me in my behaviors.

And, I just keep thinking of this quote from this book, a book written by my favorite author:

“The thing about a spiral is, if you follow it inward, it never actually ends. It just keeps tightening, infinitely.”

This is an accurate description of these spirals I get into. I’m thankful for finding representation in this book, and for feeling understood.

    In my early days of reading for pleasure regularly, I was mostly relying
Happy Valentine's Day, peeps! This week, we will continue with the love theme on our
Hello! It is time for another Top 5 Wednesday. This is a group in Goodreads,
Posted in Top Ten Tuesday

Top 10 Characters I am Grateful for

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme run by the lovely The Broke and the Bookish. For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, I will be deviating from the prompt because it is exactly the prompt for Top 5 Wednesday. I’ll be discussing my top ten characters I am grateful for this season.

Let’s go.

10. Raisa from the demon king by Cinda Williams Chima

This queen heir is driven, curious, clever, and brave. I just like that she is willing to learn more about her  people rather than live in ignorance. Plus, she doesn’t rely on people around her to inform her of what her country is like. Instead, she goes out there to see for herself. And, I love her so much.

9. felicity from the gentleman’s guide to vice and virtue by mackenzie lee

Felicity, my soul sister, has the best lines in this already-hilarious-and-poignant-book. I love how different she is from people of her time. She’s progressive, clever, and so funny. Plus, that ending with her next adventure is just perfection. I cannot wait to read her story.

8. the falconer trilogy by elizabeth may

I am grateful for the female characters in this trilogy. Elizabeth May features abuse survivors and it means the world to me to see women building each other up. The way they encourage one another, and sympathize and connect together was so moving to me. Can’t say who deals with what, obviously, but these ladies meant a ton.

Oh, and obviously, I will always be grateful for Derrick, my love.

7. diana from lord of shadows by cassandra clare

Strong, resilient and beautiful: these are some of the ways I describe Diana. Cassandra Clare introduces strong women in her stories, and with each series, she brings in even more different ways for strength to manifest. While I love Emma and Clary, Diana made my heart sing. Obviously, she and Maia will be my babies forever.

6. shadow and bone by leigh bardugo

“I am not ruined. I am ruination.” I am grateful for this line and the person who says it. Hands down one of the coolest moments in my year.

5. a darker shade of magic by victoria schwab

Delilah Bard is my dream self and my dream friend all rolled into one. I just wish I had her guts and her confidence. Having met her in the book is a highlight of my year, because I keep thinking of her. If you ever stumble on my Tumblr, I am always looking for quotes and moments about Delilah Bard. Needless to say, I am ever so grateful for her.

4. weight of feathers by anna-marie mclemore 

Lace and Luc, my precious babies, I loved meeting them, and witnessing their beautiful love story unfold in this debut by one of my favorite authors. Where are all the fan videos and the mood boards, and the fan casting? Come on, peeps, get on it!

3. six of crows by leigh bardugo

Oh my Lord. How much do I love this cast of characters, I will never be able to fully explain! Kaz, my gloomy child, and the rest of his team made a lasting impression. Inej and Nina are people I wish I’d become somehow. Wylan, Jesper, Matthias made me laugh and choke up.

2. the raven cycle by maggie stiefvater

My darling Blue Sargent, my intimidating and yet total cinnamon roll Ronan Lynch, Adam, and Gansey: I am grateful that we met this year. Their friendship is so beautiful. To the dearest ghost I have ever met, Noah Czerny, I think of you often. I am grateful you exist.

 1. harry potter series by jk rowling

Hermione Granger, Harry Potter, and Ron Weasley are my favorite buddies of all time. There are many things I don’t like about this series, so many flaws and I wish the author would take ownership of such mistakes. But, still, it was an effective story, full of incredible characters. My dear Neville Longbottom, you are fantastic. Luna Lovegood, Tonks, Remus Lupin, Sirius Black, and so many other characters I carry with me always. I am grateful for this series.

 

    I'm back with another entry for the epic Top 10 Tuesday meme, which
  Top 10 Tuesday is now hosted by the lovely The Artsy Reader Girl. It is
Top Ten Tuesday is here, and that means it's time for another list. This week,